Jamaican boa

A snake of medium size, relatively slender; Maximum length is 2.2 m. Females usually larger than males, both in length and in proportion. Have a number of 33-41 dorsal scales on the neck, 41-47 lateral, ventral 277-283, 78-79 subcaudals(Tolson & Henderson 1993). This boa mostly nocturnal, however, may take some time to basking day. (Grant 1940; Tolson & Henderson 1993). View semi the description of Tolson and Henderson (1993). Color varies widely. At the beginning of the body has yellow, yellowish brown, orange or reddish, usually darker than back. In color there are black spots, gradually forming an irregular stripe in the middle of the body. The second half of the body is predominantly black or dark blue. The whole body, especially the second half, shimmering shades of the rainbow. The upper surface of the head is usually grey or olive with dark postorbital stripes. Known some individuals completely black and Vice versa is very light. Fingerlings are usually orange, are not clearly marked bands of darker shade across the back, below the colour varies from pinkish to light orange. In captivity, reach the color of the adult to 1-1.5 years.

IUCN/IUCN 2000: Vulnerable.

CITES/CITES: Appendix I – A.

This species has a long history with a number of negative episodes from the time of colonization of Jamaica by Europeans (Tolson & Henderson 1993). Mongoose (Herpestes auropunctatus), dogs, cats and pigs probably are the reason that the species has almost disappeared from mainland Jamaica (Barbour 1910). More recent studies (Oliver, 1982; Gibson, 1996) showed that the species is still common, but highly malochislennye and low density. Most likely takes place to be the local extinction of isolated populations (See Gibson (1996) for detailed explanations.). The species is not protected in Jamaica.

The species was selected as appropriate for the program (SSP Conservation Plan Species) AZA (Association of Zoos and Aquariums) (Tolson & Henderson 1993), the conservation of the species are European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA) in the framework of EEP (Endangered Species)

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